Do I need a saltwater or freshwater license?

So a common question that FWC gets asked is when to use a saltwater fishing license or a freshwater fishing license So if you are fishing in brackish water, for example, and you catch a freshwater species, you would need a freshwater fishing license to keep that fish

You may catch red drum in brackish water for instance, which is considered saltwater so therefore you would need a saltwater fishing license For more information or for clarification you can visit MyFWCcom/Fishing

Source: Youtube

Do I need a saltwater or freshwater license?

So a common question that FWC gets asked is when to use a saltwater fishing license or a freshwater fishing license So if you are fishing in brackish water, for example, and you catch a freshwater species, you would need a freshwater fishing license to keep that fish

You may catch red drum in brackish water for instance, which is considered saltwater so therefore you would need a saltwater fishing license For more information or for clarification you can visit MyFWCcom/Fishing

Source: Youtube

Do I need a saltwater or freshwater license?

So a common question that FWC gets asked is when to use a saltwater fishing license or a freshwater fishing license So if you are fishing in brackish water, for example, and you catch a freshwater species, you would need a freshwater fishing license to keep that fish

You may catch red drum in brackish water for instance, which is considered saltwater so therefore you would need a saltwater fishing license For more information or for clarification you can visit MyFWCcom/Fishing

Do I need a saltwater or freshwater license?

So a common question that FWC gets asked is when to use a saltwater fishing license or a freshwater fishing license So if you are fishing in brackish water, for example, and you catch a freshwater species, you would need a freshwater fishing license to keep that fish

You may catch red drum in brackish water for instance, which is considered saltwater so therefore you would need a saltwater fishing license For more information or for clarification you can visit MyFWCcom/Fishing

Giant 14ft, 800lb Stingray Is The Biggest Freshwater Fsh Ever Caught With A Line In Thailand

A stingray weighing nearly 800lb has become the largest freshwater fish ever caught by rod and line The gigantic flat fish, which was 8ft wide and 14ft long, took nearly two hours to reel in

It was caught by American TV nature conservationist Jeff Corwin on the Mae Klong river in Thailand earlier this week It was so big that several men on board a small fishing boat had to take it in turns to help on the rod After getting the ray alongside the boat it was pulled into a specially-prepared pen where seven people lifted it out of the water so it could be properly measured Specialists measured its width, length and girth to calculate its weight The epic catch will be featured on 'Ocean Mysteries with Jeff Corwin', which will be broadcast on ABC in the US later this year

After the catch Mr Corwin tweeted: 'Potential world record freshwater fish, giant stingray, 14ft X 8ft! in Thailand filming for ABC's Ocean Mysteries' He added: 'According to National Geographic, Fishsiam and Dr Nantarika Chansue, a leading stingray expert, this is likely to be the largest freshwater fish ever caught with a rod and reel 'The battle to bring this giant fish to the boat was epic and it took many hours and multiple guys rotating off and on the reel 'The experience was a true highlight of the series, not only connecting with a record-sized ray but being a part of cutting edge science' Rick Humphries, of UK company Fishsiam, whose fishing guides helped reel in the ray, said: 'We have caught over 450 different stingrays and our estimations have been proved highly accurate on the rare occasions we have weighed this species

The larger specimens are always female and quite often pregnant, as was the case with this capture 'The latest capture indicates that these stingrays are growing at a fast and healthy rate' It is thought the previous record was held by British angler Ian Welch, who landed a giant stingray weighing between 590lbs and 770lbs in the same river in 2009 The Guinness Book of World Records lists the Mekong giant catfish, weighing up to 660lbs, as the 'world's largest freshwater fish'

Mark Stevenson: 2015 Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame – Texas Parks and Wildlife [Official]

[music] [Mark Stevenson, Lake Fork Fishing Guide] I fish for a living Yes

Fishing guide [Mark Stevenson] Well, I’ve been here since 1982 My wife also guides here We fish together We do a lot of the stuff together

[Mark Stevenson] Pretty day other than the cold front passing through [Barbara Stevenson, Lake Fork Fishing Guide, Mark’s Wife] I met Mark about 1978 And the only reason I recognized who he was and everything was because back then he was known as one of the best jig fishermen in the United States So I kinda, he became my fishing hero, so to speak [Mark Stevenson] Oh, come on

[Barbara Stevenson] Quick release [Mark Stevenson] Catch and release! [Mark Stevenson] There it goes [Barbara Stevenson] So it doesn’t matter what we do We enjoy doing it together, even after twenty five years [splash] [Barbara Stevenson] Wait a minute

There we go [Mark Stevenson] There you go Get ‘em [fish splashes] [Mark Stevenson] Let me get that fish for you [Barbara laughs] [Barbara Stevenson] I got it

[Mark Stevenson] My valiant and true client [Barbara Stevenson] Alright! Do your job there, guide [Mark Stevenson] Do the guide thing Get their, get the customer’s fish for them [Barbara Stevenson] Alright! [Mark Stevenson] There you go! [Barbara laughs] [Barbara Stevenson] You go ahead and take it out, too

[Mark Stevenson] Take the hook out for you [Barbara Stevenson] Would you fix my bait, please [Mark Stevenson] I’ll fix your bait Pretty fish See that tail, not beat up? That fish is just now coming in

[Mark Stevenson] I really enjoy teaching other people how to fish [fish splashes] [Mark Stevenson] We’ll be sitting and talking in the boat and they’ll ask me about this rod and reel, this equipment They can give you the product number, the weight, what page it's on, what ah, all this How fast this boat’s gonna go How much it weighs

What kind of gas mileage it gets, and on and on and on And I ask one simple question It is February The water is 45° Where you most likely to find the fish

A bass fish And be able to catch them [music] [Mark Stevenson] And the blank look gets on the face [Mark Stevenson] I started fishing with my dad a long time ago And after he died, and I was doing the paper route, just kind of continued on fishing

And then I had a little time there that I didn’t fish cause I went into the Army But the bug hit me again and so in ’72, I bought a bass boat and have been just doing it ever since [music] [Mark Stevenson] A big cold front had come through, and we were just going down the side of a creek I reached down, picked up my rod, made one pitch in there, boom! Brought her to the boat, netted her and that was it I mean, it was just… [Mark Stevenson] What are you gonna call that fish? And I thought for a minute and it just popped in my head, Ethel

[laughs] [Richard McCarty, Fishing Guide] You just can't imagine what a fish like that was at that time Even today, it would be mind boggling But at that time, it didn't look real It wasn't real In my eyes, it wasn't a real fish

[Frank Ray Johnson, Quitman, Texas] Mark was the first man to catch the state record at the same time that Parks and Wildlife was starting the Share-A-Lunker Program Everything came together at the same time And I don't think, in hindsight, it could have been done any better [music] [Richard McCarty] And it just basically opened the flood gates for people to come to Lake Fork Now people knew that they were in here, the businesses just doubled and tripled

[Mark Stevenson] The lure of the big fish worked It gave a lot of validity of a fish that big of what the Parks and Wildlife was doing to further the fishing in Texas in the big fish [music] [Barbara Stevenson] Hello, you beautiful fish [Barbara Stevenson] Being on the lake, whether I'm catching or not, that's my happy place And that's the same way with Mark

[Barbara Stevenson] Come here Easy does it And that’s what we’re out here for [Mark Stevenson] As far as me? Fishing? I’m going to keep fishing until I can’t crawl in the boat It’s just that simple

And I enjoy catching them I like to catch them every day When I can’t stand up in the boat, then I’ll quit (laughs)

Freshwater Fishing Lures Presentation

Hello and welcome to TheModernFisherman Today I will be teaching you about fishing lures Including Jigs, Spinners,Spoons, Soft Plastic Baits, Plugs, Spinnerbaits/Buzzbaits, and Flies First off we have Jigs We have a couple of them that are extremely realistic and a couple that look like worms Like this pink one, Yellow one, and this White one This one is just a smaller version of this larger one butuhit still worksit jigs across the bottom of the sea and that's how you catch fish Then we have spinners We have a couple of different spinners from my collection We also have some with a furry bottom surrounding the hook so that the hook doesn't get caught by the weeds Unlike the first one here where the hook can easily get caught We also have spoons courtesy of b2b

mauricenet We have a large one with red and white on it A silver one, a blue and silver, a green yellow orange, and a silver one What these spoons do is they go throughout the water and spin around looking as if they are minnows to attract the fish Also we have Soft Plastic Baits also from my collection Very proud of that one right there It took a while to create We have a regular worm, and another regular worm with a flashing mechanism that causes fish to be attracted to the worm We also have a worm with a sinker head and a swivel We also have a couple of plugs courtesy of yachtsailingcharterscom They all look like minnows A Crayfish More minnows This is also a spinner bait from my collection What spinner baits do is they go throughout the water These little spinning items spin rapidly attracting fish and then the fish bite the lure The purpose of all these little strings are All of the little string here protect the hook here from the weeds so when in the weeds the front ones go back and creates a large barrier for the hook And last but not least we have the flies We have two flies They are cheap flies Thanks for Watching!!

Appalachian Highlands Network Freshwater Mussel & Cobble Bar Monitoring

(wilderness sounds) (lighthearted instrumental music) – [Voiceover] Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River are two of the very few remaining rivers in the region that are protected – [Voiceover] The Big South Fork is one of the crown jewels in the Cumberland River System

It is one of the last places in which you can still find some of our most rare species – There are over 50 mussel species and probably 25% of them are federally endangered – This is Epioblasma brevidens, the Cumberland combshell, a federally endangered species Big South Fork is one of the last great places this animal occurs – [Voiceover] Mussels are considered important because they are, if you will, the canaries in the coal mine

They are filter feeders, they don't move, so whatever comes down the river, in terms of contamination, they're subjected to, they cannot avoid it So what's being done here is long-term quantitative monitoring to figure out what species of mussels are here and how many – The actual process is to establish a grid in these locations within those grids we monitor square meter units and within a sampling frame we'll count the mussels, identify the species and measure the mussels so over time we have a good idea of how the mussel populations are doing, how many young ones, middle aged ones, and old ones are there, what the structure of the population is – These are two individuals, same species, the individual in my left hand is perhaps three, four years old The individual on my right, guessed on the number of growth lines, this thing is quite old

– It can be very difficult to find mussels – especially in a cobble gravel environment They range in size from the size of your little fingernail to the size of a small dinner plate They blend in, they are partially buried or completely buried, and so it takes a trained eye to find them sometimes – Mussel monitoring involves taking the mussels out of their habitat in the substrate and handling them briefly because there are endangered species involved we have to have people that have been permitted by the US

Fish and Wildlife Service We place them back in the substrate as close to the original orientation as we can Out of an abundance of caution, we don't do this monitoring often We only do it infrequently, every three years – Of the 300 species of freshwater mussels in North America, about 70 percent of them are imperiled, they're declining, or they have disappeared altogether

It's important to monitor what we have left because that way we know what's happening in our rivers (wilderness sounds) – [Voiceover] Cobble bars are a unique vegetation community in the bottom of these steep-walled river gorges – and they resemble the Western tall grass prairies – They have a lot of the same species – but they have a lot of their own endemic species, species that don't occur anywhere else in the world Unlike the tall grass prairies of the West that are maintained by wildfire, these are maintained by the roaring floods that come down these rivers and scour everything that's not flood-adapted away The plants that are native to the cobble bars have really deep strong roots, most of their mass, most of the plants are actually underground, so if their top parts are scoured away by the floods they can easily re-grow the top parts

They include the two main species of tall grass that are the keystone species in the Western prairies, big bluestem and Indian grass The roots go 15 feet into the ground, winding their way between the rocks and holding them solidly there And they hold everything in place against the force of the floods It's hard to believe, but sometimes, on this very plot, right where we're standing, there is a house-sized pile of woody debris, of logs, giant logs, trees this big around, that have just been washed in by the river and all piled up here I've seen that pile here 15 to 20 feet high, right where we're standing

And then you come back a week later and another flood has come through and washed it away The point of the long-term monitoring of the cobble bars that we're doing is to see if the community is changing Most of these species cannot survive in shade, so if anything happens to cause trees to advance out over these habitats that species would completely disappear, they'd be gone This is Cumberland rosemary, it's a federally-listed, threatened plant and the vast majority of all that remains in the world is inside the boundaries of Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River (lighthearted instrumental music) Some of these cobble bars are pretty challenging, most of them involve a lot of off-trail work, a lot of bushwhacking down extremely steep places

Sometimes it's crawling on hands and knees hauling a heavy pack, and then, either swimming or wading the river to get to where you need to be The monitoring that we do has to be something that can be objectively quantified and then repeated several years later and then repeated the same way You can walk out on to a cobble bar and say, “well, it kind of looks different to me”, but that doesn't count, you have to have something that you can measure And so the way we do that is to pull transect tapes out across the cobble bar at intervals Transects have to be straight, and so if you're pulling the transect tape and you see a wall of greenbriar in front of you and black locust, you can't go around it

You have to go straight through it, that tape has to be straight, and then we use a laser device every half-meter along that transect to count what we're hitting in terms of the stony substrate, the grass that's supposed to be there, the other herbs that are supposed to be there, or the woody things that are not supposed to be there And we measure the extent of canopy over the line, over those transect tapes, by species so that we know whether they are being invaded by species that are not flood-adapted, which is a very bad sign, or whether they are being encroached upon by species like sycamores and river birches that are supposed to be there (lighthearted instrumental music) This river system, not just the river itself and the aquatic creatures, the fish and the fresh water mussels that live in it, but everything adjacent to it, even the forests that come down to the edge of the river, definitely the cobble bars, all of it is connected The other things that we monitor, the freshwater mussels, the water quality are very important – As a manager of the park, you can't manage resources without having scientific data

So the scientific data associated with the monitoring program, gives us the ability to understand the natural environment, the health of the river and its organisms – The value of long-term monitoring is so that we can know what's happening to the plants and animals and their habitats, in the time that we can do something about it – One never knows what all the connections are, what it would cost if those species were lost, if this habitat type were lost These things might not still be here if it weren't for the protection of the National Park Service (lighthearted instrumental music)